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As a Martha Pullen licensed sewing teacher I love to learn new sewing techniques and I equally enjoy teaching sewing techniques to others.  You can also find me teaching Bernina Customer Courses at my local Bernina dealer.  In addition, I demonstrate Stampin' Up products.  I am a servant of the Lord of Lords and King of Kings, wife of one, mom of two, and grandma of five.  Welcome to my sewing and crafting studio!

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

If a Sewist Could Cut Continuous Binding, How Much Continuous Binding Could a Sewist Cut . . .



I prefer to cut my own binding rather than to purchase the prepackaged type.
That way I have access to an endless assortment of colors and prints.

I was making a cute wrap skirt for my cute granddaughter (more on that in a future post),
and I wanted to use my handy dandy Bernina binder attachment for the skirt binding,
so my binding strips had to be cut at 1 1/2 " wide.

Now there are oodles of tutorials out there on how to make continuous bias binding,
so I won't try to reinvent the wheel.
If you need good instructions on said process, go here and/or here.

It doesn't look like that small piece of fabric (I used a 12" square) will yield much binding
but you might be surprised at the results.
I've always wondered just how much binding could a sewist cut with varying size squares of fabric.

I'm here to tell you that a mere 12" square will result in a whopping 200 inches, or 5 1/3 yards,
of beautiful 1 1/2" bias binding strips.

Your bias binding can be used to finish armhole edges, neckline edges,
or outside edges of anything from aprons to cute, little granddaughter wrap skirts.

When you use the bias binder attachment, roll up your flat binding strip and drop it into
a container such as a mason jar
(a beautiful blue jar enhances the sewing enjoyment).
That way, the binding strip won't tangle or knot as you're sewing.

I found that when I placed the jar on the floor in front of my machine,
the binding twisted just as it entered the bias binder attachment.
Not good.

However, when I positioned the jar next to and in front of my sewing machine,
all went smoothly.
Good.

I hope this helps you, my friends.
As I have occasion to make other widths of continuous bias binding,
I will update this post with those results as well.
Or . . . if you have made continuous bias binding with this method,
by all means, share your results with us.

 Until next time, bind away!






Monday, June 1, 2015

Daysail for Summer


It's my goal to fill this entry wall with mini quilts.
As you can see, I've just begun!
The newest little mini is that one on the left.
The pattern, Dwell, is from Thimble Blossoms and
the fabric is Daysail by Bonnie and Camille.

I used a combination of figure 8's and straight line quilting to
finish up this sweet wall decoration.
Thanks for stopping by, my friends.
Please send me an email or leave a comment.
I love to chat with, and learn from, other sewists.
Have a terrific sewing week.



Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Pretty Potent Portrait Dress

Here's yet another project using some of the fabric I purchased at #craftsouth last September.
The body of the dress is "Pretty Potent" rayon by Anna Maria Horner
and the linen yoke fabric was also purchased during my #craftsouth trip.

The dress pattern is Anna Maria Horner Painted Portrait Blouse and Dress.
What a great pattern!
This one is by far my favorite garment pattern in quite some time.
I sewed the size medium without any alterations at it fits beautifully.
I love how the side panels taper down each side of the back yoke.
It makes for a flattering silhouette.
The dress closure is a button and a hand-sewn loop.
So easy, so clean, so effective.
The armhole openings are finished with bias tape, which I made from cotton.
To add the machine embroidery, I scanned one of Anna Maria Horner's designs
(from the Fields Aflutter hand embroidery collection) into my Bernina embroidery software.
Then I sized and digitized it to coordinate with the dress.
Stitching the design out on the linen before cutting the pattern piece eliminates the fussiness of
centering the design on a small piece of fabric after the pattern piece has been cut.

Have a most pleasant week, my friends, and stitch up something pretty potent.
I love to hear from you, so please leave me a comment or send me an email.


Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Stampin' and Stitchin': Handmade Baby Gift

#handmadeisthebest
Here's a sweet baby gift for a special couple who recently added a baby boy to their family.
The diaper carrier is based on the tried and true pattern that I've sewn up a number of times.
This go 'round, I added some little machine embroidered bees to the front.
If you look closely at the fabric, you'll see the fabric is printed with bees as well.
 I hand stitched an oversized snap in place for the closure on this one.


 The self-made binding on the pocket opening edges
was attached using the Bernina binder attachment #88.
#stampinupdemonstrator #stampinup #berrybasket
The Stampin' Up Berry Basket (Bigz L Die, item #137366)
is the perfect size to hold baby wash cloths and travel size toiletries.
 To make a fabric covered berry basket of your own:
 - cut the base from vanilla coaster board (Stampin' Up item #129392)
- choose a Stampin' Up cardstock color of your choice for the inside
- and finally, use some iron on stabilizer or interfacing on the wrong side of your fabric
and run it through your Big Shot (item #113439) one last time with the Berry Basket die
When you have those three sets of components cut,
spread a thin coating of Tombo Multi (item #110755) onto the coaster board
and adhere your cardstock to one side and your fabric to the opposite side.
I also adhered some ribbon to the trim piece.
Then assemble your Berry Basket and fill it up with gifty goodness.
I used a storage bag (not the kind with the zipper) to enclose my basket for gift giving.
#stampinupdemonstrator  #handpickedframelits #stampinup
The top of the storage bag is kept closed with a tab which I cut using
Stampin' Up's Handpicked Framelits Die set (item #137361).
The "sweet as can be" phrase is part of the From the Garden stamp set (item #137139).
Once again, cut this one first from coaster board, then cover it
with a piece of card stock stamped with your sentiment.
The final element of this sweet baby gift is a handmade garland for baby's room.
Using the Woodland Creatures Clip Art set from Amy J. Delightful's Etsy shop
I printed the images on card stock, carefully cut them out,
and then stitched them together using my sewing machine.
#amyjdelightful
 Here they are all packaged up in a cello envelope and sealed with washi tape.
Gift giving is so much fun!

Have a great week, my friends.


Friday, April 24, 2015

Frozen Falls Crochet Throw

No doubt about it, quilts make a house a home.
But when quilts and crochet throws intermingle,
homey is elevated to cozy.

#loveofcrochet
This one is from the Winter 2013 issue of Love of Crochet.
It's called Frozen Falls and I thought the
Martha Stewart Extra Soft Wool Blend yarn
in Igloo was the perfect frozen color to pair with the pattern.


It is such a soft yarn and when combined with this stitch pattern,
makes for a beautifully, soft, drapey throw.


One feature that I've never stitched before is the reverse crochet around the edge.
The pattern instructs to work a reverse single crochet around the throw.
In my excitement to finish up this project, I wasn't paying close attention,
and I ended up crocheting a reverse double crochet.
Of course, it was more time consuming than a reverse single crochet would have been,
but I am pleased with the end result.
My daughter commented that the edging finishes it off like binding on a quilt.


Some You Tube videos proved to be helpful in learning this new technique.
I love how it completes the throw.
Have you ever done reverse crochet?
I had never even heard of it until I stitched this pattern.

Happy crocheting, my friends!